• About CIVIC

    CIVIC is a Washington-based non-profit organization that believes the civilians injured and the families of those killed should be recognized and helped by the warring parties involved.

    On this blog, you will find stories from our travels around the world as we meet with civilians and military, aid organizations and government in our quest to get war victims the help they need.

  • Countries

  • Contributors

    Sarah, Executive Director

    Marla B, Managing Director

    Kristele, Field Director

    Liz, Chief Communications Officer

    Trevor, CIVIC's fellow based in Afghanistan

    Chris, CIVIC's fellow based in Pakistan

    Jon, CIVIC's US military consultant

  • Media Content

  • Advertisements

Aid isn’t one-size-fits-all…

Posted By: Marla B.

Erica’s story illustrates an interesting point. As you well know, we believe civilians suffering in armed conflict need and deserve help. The difficult question becomes ‘what kind of help’? This question cannot be answered without a firm grasp on the dynamics not only of this conflict but also of this particular community. As we’ve seen in several cases in the past, sometimes the best option is victim specific redress. But in this particularly difficult security situation, our answer comes in the form of community re-building. To be sure, there can be no ‘magic’ answer to the question – one that works for every situation. Each conflict, each case has to be considered on its own. What we can be sure about is that regardless of the type of aid, it is imperative to help civilians harmed in ways both feasible and meaningful to them.

Advertisements

Shar-e-Cott, pt. 1

Posted By: Erica

In Afghanistan, even when there is the will and the resources, increasing security considerations often make it difficult to impossible to reach civilians caught in conflict. When I was in Gardez a couple of weeks ago, I witnessed an ACAP distribution of tools and materials to support a community construction project for the small village of Shar-e-cott, about an hour away from Gardez City. Shar-e-Cott suffered extensive damage during the US air campaign in 2001, but because of its location and security issues, few aid workers, international or local, have been able to access it. The population of 2,500 has been waiting seven years for some sort of help rebuilding, much less genuine redress.

As mentioned in other blogs, ACAP usually works similar to livelihood-targeted social work – they work with individual families to help them rebuild their lives and find other means of income to get them back on their feet. Given the continuing instability in Shar-e-Cott, that type of work is not possible. Even local staff members would be at risk for kidnappings or reprisals. Instead ACAP has developed a community reconstruction project for Shar-e-Cott that may become a model for ways to reach out to these types of communities. The next blog will share a bit more about this type of project and what it meant for the community of Shar-e-Cott

Photo: Shar-e-Cott.