• About CIVIC

    CIVIC is a Washington-based non-profit organization that believes the civilians injured and the families of those killed should be recognized and helped by the warring parties involved.

    On this blog, you will find stories from our travels around the world as we meet with civilians and military, aid organizations and government in our quest to get war victims the help they need.

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  • Contributors

    Sarah, Executive Director

    Marla B, Managing Director

    Kristele, Field Director

    Liz, Chief Communications Officer

    Trevor, CIVIC's fellow based in Afghanistan

    Chris, CIVIC's fellow based in Pakistan

    Jon, CIVIC's US military consultant

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FT. LEAVENWORTH: CIVIC Participating in Military Training Exercise

Posted By:  Marla B

Sarah and I are here at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas this week at the Army Command and General Staff College (CGSC).  CGSC is a leading educational and intellectual center for the Army in developing leaders for full spectrum joint, interagency and multinational operations.  We were invited to participate in a training exercise with this year’s class.  Participation of NGOs in this level of military training is an excellent opportunity and one we are finding the military is becoming more and more open to.  After just one day (the whole exercise runs a full week) we are incredibly impressed with what we’ve seen.  The schedule is quite packed but we’ll post updates when we can.

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GUEST BLOGGER: Grieving a Son in Kandahar – Part 2

Posted By: Rebecca W., working with CIVIC’s Erica in Afghanistan

Read Part 1…

Zalmai was a taxi driver and the main earner for his family. His income supported ten family members, including an older brother who was shot by the Russians and is paralyzed down the right side of his body. Now the family, which includes four children under the age of three, is finding it extremely difficult to survive. They receive wheat and vegetables from relatives and depend on their neighbors’ generosity.

Things began to look a little more optimistic for Ahmed when one of his relatives told him about the USAID-funded ACAP program. “Finally,” he told me, “I began to feel that there might be hope.” ACAP has agreed to buy the family a cow. “With the cow, we can manufacture milk, yogurt and we will sell this in the bazaar and get income.” As he told me this, a smile finally appeared on his face. Ahmed is still clearly grieving for his son, but now at least he can continue building a future for his family.

GUEST BLOGGER: The Dangers of Assisting Civilians, Kandahar ACAP Field-Officer Captured by the Taliban

Posted By: Rebecca W., working with CIVIC’s Erica in Afghanistan

[Written 7/20/08] I went this morning to the Kandahar IOM/ACAP office (ACAP is the program created by the United States to help war victims and IOM is the agency that implements it across the country). I met the staff and talked with one field officer who travels around the southern provinces to find harmed civilians and verify information that has been submitted to the office. He has worked with ACAP for three years. He told me that his job was rewarding but also dangerous: a few months ago, he went into a remote village to survey an ACAP-funded construction project when he suddenly found himself surrounded by gun-wielding Taliban fighters. They accused him of supporting the international forces. As he was being taken away by the Taliban, a close friend saw him and negotiated his release – the only reason he is alive today. Such stories emphasize the difficulty in assisting civilians in this charged atmosphere, where humanitarian projects are frequently targeted by the Taliban and Afghan NGO workers are regularly kidnapped for their “foreign involvement.”

GUEST BLOGGER: Kandahar Field-Visit, Reports of Civilian Mutilations in the Southern Provinces

Posted By: Rebecca W., working with CIVIC’s Erica in Afghanistan

[Written 7/19/08] I arrived in Kandahar this morning. My first stop was Kandahar Air Field (KAF) where I met with a government official who accompanies military forces into remote parts of the southern provinces and organizes stabilization projects. His stories were nothing short of shocking. He described finding one young woman who had, he was told, been a sex slave to the Taliban. She had been raped, mutilated and killed. Such stories suggest that there are horrific atrocities (what the international community would call “war crimes”) committed against civilians that are hard to document and verify. Many regions in this part of Afghanistan are controlled by the Taliban and other Anti-Government Elements (AGEs) rendering them completely inaccessible to most NGOs. So many civilians are left without help.

Peaceful Conflict Resolution?

Posted By: Erica

Last week, an Afghan organization I’m helping here in Kabul co-hosted a conflict resolution workshop with a Washington-DC based institution. Two trainers flew out from Washington to lead the three-day training session for about 20 Afghan NGO employees — from both international and local NGOs. Continue reading

Life as an ex-pat

Posted By: Erica

Most of my blogs have focused on work issues, but my CIVIC colleagues have encouraged me to post a bit on life in Kabul.  Contrary to the perceptions of some of my friends and family, I don’t hear bombs or see the ongoing conflict on a daily basis. Life in Kabul for non-Afghan ex-patriates (ex-pats) is affected more by the preventive security measures than by actual violence.  Journalists, freelancers, independent entrepreneurs, and some NGO staff tend to have the least restrictions and may enjoy a relatively normal life.  They may walk in the street sometimes, buy their own groceries and supplies, go to Afghan restaurants (as opposed to sticking only to the string of rocket-and mortar-secured ex-pat restaurants), take regular Afghan taxis, hike or go climbing in the mountains surrounding Kabul, etc. Continue reading